What Is Collateral?

what is collateral?

Collateral is a term used to describe an asset that a lender accepts as security for a loan. Depending on the purpose of the loan, collateral can be real estate or other types of assets. For the lender, the collateral serves as a type of insurance. If the borrower defaults on their loan payments, the lender can seize and sell the collateral to recoup some or all of their losses.

how collateral works

A lender wants to ensure that you’ll be able to repay the loan before giving it to you. As a result, many of them require some level of protection. Collateral is a type of security that reduces the risk for lenders and ensures that the borrower fulfills their financial obligations. If the borrower defaults, then the lender has the option to seize the collateral and sell it, with the proceeds going toward the unpaid amount of the loan. To reclaim any leftover balance, the lender can take legal action against the borrower. 

As previously stated, collateral can take many forms. It usually refers to the type of loan; for example, a mortgage is secured by the residence, but a car loan is secured by the vehicle in issue. Other assets can be used to secure non-specific personal loans. For example, a secured credit card can require a cash deposit equal to the credit limit, such as $500 for a $500 credit limit.

Collateral-backed loans often have lower interest rates than unsecured loans. A lien is a legal right or claim on an asset to satisfy a debt that a lender has on the collateral of a borrower. The borrower has a powerful incentive to repay the loan on time because, if they don’t, they risk losing their home or other collateralized assets.

types of collateral

The type of loan frequently determines the nature of the collateral. Your home becomes the collateral when you take out a mortgage. If you take out a car loan, the car becomes the loan’s collateral. Cars, bank savings deposits, and investment accounts are all frequent forms of collateral that lenders accept. In most cases, retirement accounts are not accepted as collateral.

Future paychecks can also be used as security for very short-term loans, not just payday loans. Traditional banks provide such loans, which are typically for a few weeks. Even if you have a true emergency, you should read the fine print and compare rates before taking out one of these short-term loans.

COLLATERALIZED PERSONAL LOANS

A collateralized personal loan is a type of borrowing in which the borrower pledges an object of value as security for the loan. The collateral must be worth at least as much as the loan amount. If you’re looking for a secured personal loan, your best bet is to go with a financial institution with which you already do business, especially if your collateral is your savings account. If you already have a relationship with the bank, it will be more likely to approve the loan and provide you with a reasonable interest rate.

Examples of collateral loans

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGES
A mortgage is a loan that uses your home as collateral. If a homeowner fails to pay their mortgage for more than 120 days, the loan company can initiate legal action, which could result in the lender taking possession of the home through foreclosure. The property might be sold to satisfy the remaining principal on the loan once it has been transferred to the lender.
HOME EQUITY LOANS
A home can also be used to secure a second mortgage or a home equity line of credit (HELOC). The loan amount will not exceed the available equity in this scenario. For example, if a home is worth $200,000 and the primary mortgage balance is $125,000, a second mortgage or HELOC will only be available for up to $75,000.
MARGIN TRADING
Margin trading also considers securitized loans. An investor uses the balance in his or her brokerage account as collateral to borrow money from a broker to gain shares. The loan increases the number of shares an investor can purchase, hence boosting the potential gains if the value of the shares rises. However, the risks are amplified as well. If the value of the shares drops, the broker will demand payment of the difference. If the borrower fails to cover the loss, the account acts as collateral.

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DiCenzo Homes has proposed a 12-storey, 165-unit residential tower at 639 Rymal Rd. in Hamilton.

DiCenzo Homes proposes a 12-storey residential tower on Hamilton Mountain

It’s great to see that over the last two weeks, we’ve continued to see good deal flow, despite interest rates tightening activity to some extent.

This week’s largest transaction took place in Grimsby, where Anatolia Group purchased 35.3 acres of vacant industrial land for $56.3 million (nearly $1.6 million/acre).

The price of Hamilton industrial land continues to escalate.

Other notable transactions include:

  1. downtown corner property at 150 Main St. E. was purchased for $6.1 million ($9.5 million/acre), which is comparable to high-density residential land values.
  2. Granite REIT purchased 10 acres of residential land in Brantford for $6.3 million (nearly $630,000/acre).

It’s also great to see that multiple office transactions have taken place over the last two weeks, with the majority being medical-related.

In the news,

  • DiCenzo Homes has proposed a 12-storey residential tower.
  • Hamilton Council rejected a plan to exempt part of Ancaster from housing intensification.
  • The national industrial vacancy rate hit a record low of 1.6%.
The GHA Sales Transaction Database offers you this week’s CRE transaction activity.
News Headlines

Hamilton Design Review Panel: 639 Rymal Rd. W.
August 2022

253 King William development to lease units for as little as $85/month
Fast Company, August 19, 2022

Council rejects plant to exempt part of Ancaster from housing intensification
The Hamilton Spectator, August 16, 2020

Leap of faith: Hamilton church converted into apartments
The Hamilton Spectator, August 23, 2020

Evolving Workforces: Toronto Lab Market H1 2022 Report — A Nascent Real Estate Market On The Rise
CBRE Research, August 2022

Councillors approve townhouse development on Rymal Rd
The Hamilton Spectator, August 16, 2020

Last Stelco blast furnace demolished on Hamilton bayfront
The Hamilton Spectator, August 17, 2020

New Vision church needs $3.9M to transform into 1,000 seat music venue
CBC News, August 22, 2022

New Hamilton census data 
The Hamilton Spectator, August 24, 2022

How Hamilton, Burlington have changed since last census
The Hamilton Spectator, August 24, 2022

Hamilton’s Beasley Park to receive project funding
CBC News, August 27, 2022

Granite kicks off Brantford business park
RENX, August 19, 2022

Waterloo’s sky-rocketing rental prices show no signs of slowing
The Record, August 24, 2022

Niagara needs 32,000 homes over next decade
The St. Catharines Standard, August 22, 2022

Toronto area CRE deals total $7B, up 43% y/y
The Toronto Star, August 18, 2022

Ontario’s 1.5M homes by 2031 not likely 
The CBC News, August 16, 2022

National industrial vacancy rate hits record low of 1.6%
The Globe & Mail, August 22, 2022

212 Glover Rd. in Hamilton

Alex Manojlovich’s Weekly Market Report: LiUNA files two non-decision appeals to OLT

The week’s most significant transaction was for this 65-acre vacant industrial site at 212 Glover Rd. in Hamilton.

This week witnessed a decent volume of deals, with Hamilton being the top performer for the second consecutive week.

The volume of transactions continues to be steady since the Bank of Canada increased its rate by 1.00% to 2.50% on July 13.

This week’s largest transaction occurred in Hamilton, where IKEA Properties purchased a 65-acre vacant industrial site at 212 Glover Rd. for $82 million (approximately $1.25 million/acre). This looks to be a good price, as the cost of industrial land in Hamilton is rising quickly. Specifically, this industrial land node close to Nebo Rd. has witnessed land transactions of $1.5 million for smaller parcels. Also of note is the neighbouring industrial land at 190 Glover Rd., which was purchased by RFA Capital for approximately $6 million ($1.2 million/acre).

This week’s second-largest transaction occurred in Kitchener, where Fusion Homes purchased 6.9 acres of residential land for $3.2 million/acre.

In the news, LiUNA has filed two non-decision appeals to the OLT, Metrolinx has released a video previewing how the LRT will be constructed, and the Toronto rental market is tightening.

News Headlines

LiUNA files two non-decision appeals to OLT
The Public Record, July 25, 2022

CityHousing Hamilton projects face $5.4M gap
The Hamilton Spectator, July 25, 2022

Metrolinx releases new video highlighting how Hamilton’s LRT will be constructed
In The Hammer, July 25, 2022

New noise study underway on City Centre development application
The Public Record, July 29, 2022

OPM moves into former Walmart, future NHDG development
The Hamilton Spectator, July 22, 2022

Widespread support for car-free King St experiment
The Hamilton Spectator, August 2, 2022

Intelligent Investment: Canadian Cap Rates & Investment Insights Report
CBRE Research, Q2 2022

Toronto rental market tightens as ‘uneconomical” projects get scrapped
BNN Bloomberg, July 22, 2022

More families are choosing multigenerational living amid Canada’s housing crisis
The Globe & Mail, July 25, 2022

Hamilton airport attracts flurry of industrial sales, development

Hamilton airport attracts flurry of industrial sales, development

Steve McLean, RENX, March 1, 2022

Pictured: A 55-acre industrial development site at 9555 Airport Rd. in Hamilton, acquired by Hopewell and Nicola Wealth. (Courtesy Hopewell)

John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport has grown to become one of Canada’s largest airports for domestic air-cargo distribution, and developers, investors and users are scooping up nearby land for logistics and fulfillment centres.

“It speaks to what’s happened with industrial lands in Southwestern Ontario as well as Hamilton more specifically,” Joe Benninger, vice-president with CBRE’s Southern Ontario investment team, told RENX. “Hamilton was a tough place to sell land three or four years ago. READ MORE >>

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