Hamilton’s high-density sector maturing

Just like mid-month, the end of December witnessed good transaction levels. No major deals took place in Hamilton, which could be a sign of things to come in 2023.

The largest transaction of the week took place in Cambridge, where Smartstop Self Storage purchased a 200,000 sq. ft asset for $36 million ($176/sq. ft).

The second largest transaction occurred in Thorold, where Bioveld purchased approximately 450,000 sq. ft of an industrial asset, with additional land, along the Welland Canal and will reportedly lease to the Hamilton-Oshawa Port Authority.

In Hamilton, the largest deal was for a 9,000 sq. ft office, which sold for $1.85 million ($206/sq. ft), which is about the typical value for most of the (very few) office transactions.

In the news, Hamilton‘s high-density sector is maturing, immigration to Canada hit a record in 2022, and the labour market crushed forecasts.

If you’re interested in learning what happened in Hamilton during 2022 and the trends heading into 2023, please join me at The Hamilton Commercial Real Estate Report: Year in Review at CoMotion on King at 115 King St. E. on January 25 at noon. RSVP today!

The GHA Sales Transaction Database offers you this week’s CRE transaction activity.

News Headlines

Greenbelt infrastructure issues could delay homebuilders 
The Toronto Star, December 30, 2022

Hamilton’s high-density sector is maturing
RENX, January 6, 2023

Hamilton Jamesville redevelopment stalled by CN appeal
The Hamilton Spectator, January 6, 2023

Labour market crushes forecasts, increases odds of rate hike
BNN Bloomberg, January 6, 2023

Record number of condos to hit Toronto market in 2023
The Globe and Mail, January 3, 2023

Immigration to Canada hits record in 2022
The Globe and Mail, January 3, 2023

Why those waiting for a return to normal commercial real estate will get left behind
The Financial Times, January 2, 2023

Meet Brandon Rynka, Owner of BR365 Strength Lab Gym

brandon Wants to get you stronger — painlessly!

BR365 Strength Lab owner Brandon Rynka wants to get you stronger, fitter, and more resilient at his beautiful new, pain-free, results-driven strength training gym.

At BR365 Strength Lab, your workout programming is structured, phased, and planned to optimize your results.

Brandon uses adaptation in his fitness programs which can aid you in:

  • Becoming stronger
  • Building muscle
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  • Burning off body fat
  • Increasing explosiveness
  • Improving power output
  • Enhancing athleticism
  • Speeding up metabolism
  • Assisting in regulating hormones through strength training

A different kind of science lab

BR365 Strength Lab uses scientific and applied strength methods for genuine, lasting results. Brandon focuses on training rather than exercise. Exercise is for general physical maintenance, where as training is a results-driven method to increase strength, muscle, power, and speed while addressing pain-relief.

The BR365 Strength Lab offers you real results from proven strength coaches and athletes.

Services designed for you

The lab offers:
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The lab offers 7 types of memberships, including a First Responder Membership available at a special rate.

get in touch

BR365 Strength Lab
brandonrynka365@gmail.com
Insta: @br365strengthlab
315 Brock Rd., Hamilton, ON L9H 5H7

about 315 brock Rd.

This 9-unit property is in a prime location in the centre of the high net worth community of Greensville. It’s been recently renovated inside and out features spacious parking lots and large, glass loading doors. It is adaptable for industrial use, retail, and more. 315 Brock Rd. is in close proximity to downtown Dundas, Waterdown, Tews Falls, Dundas Peak, and Webster’s Falls. In peak season, it sees immense foot traffic and drive-by traffic. Learn more about 315 Brock Rd. >>

Imagine the possibilities!

CONTACT A FORGE & FOSTER LEASING SPECIALIST

Book your private tour of 315 Brock and find your future space
leasing[@]forge&foster.ca
(888) 410-9440

Downtown Hamilton Site Purchased by Fengate

Alex Manojlovich presents Forge & Foster’s Hamilton Commercial Real Estate Report Year in Review on January 25 at CoMotion on King at 115 King St. E. We encourage savvy investors and well-informed citizens alike to join us for valuable insights at this free public event. Refreshments provided. RSVP today!

This week witnessed good transaction levels in Hamilton and Kitchener, with Niagara and Brantford winding down.

This week’s largest transaction took place in Kitchener, where the Waterloo Catholic District School Board purchased land from the Grand River Conservation Authority for approximately $12.7 million.

Also in KitchenerIN8 Developments purchased a downtown parcel for $10.3 million ($17.7 million/acre). IN8 Developments is currently working towards the City Centre Mall development in Hamilton.

In Hamilton, a similar transaction took place as Fengate Asset Management purchased 48 Ferguson Ave. S. for $7.5 million ($16.6 million/acre) for what appears to be a future development site.  A high value that usually represents some approvals have been attained, however, I’m personally unaware of any.

In the news, Hamilton councillors approved Upper James property rezoning, the Hamilton airport cargo business is flourishing, and the Province has removed 7,400 acres from the Greenbelt.

Happy holidays, everyone! The next newsletter will be on January 3. Subscribe today!

News Headlines

Council approved Upper James property zoning for 8 storeys
The Hamilton Spectator, December 13, 2022

City of Hamilton not opposing Dundas developer’s land tribunal appeal  
The Hamilton Spectator, December 13, 2022

Hamilton airport cargo business outpaces the rest of Canada
Canadian Aviation News, December 14, 2022

Mission Services aim to open new shelter early next year
The Hamilton Spectator, December 14, 2022

Hamilton e-scooter pilot to get rolling next spring
The Hamilton Spectator, December 20, 2022

Ontario government removes 7,400 acres from Greenbelt
The Globe & Mail, December 17, 2022

Shopify confirms it no longer intends to expand to new office development, The Well
The Toronto Star, December 14, 2022

Alternative Investments: 8 New Ways to Grow Your Wealth

Are you looking to grow your wealth in new and innovative ways? If so, alternative investments may be the solution for you.

Alternative investments can include a wide range of options, such as fractional investing, venture capital, and more. By diversifying your portfolio with alternative investments, you can help reduce your risk while also increasing your potential for earnings.

So, if you’re ready to explore some new investment opportunities, read on for more details. Not only are these investments rising in popularity and becoming part of the average investor’s portfolio, but you may be surprised at just how beneficial they can be!

8 ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENTS

fractional investing

Fractional investing is a relatively new investment opportunity that allows you to invest in assets such as real estate, art, and wine. With fractional investing, you don’t have to purchase an entire asset – you can buy a small slice of it instead.

This makes it a more affordable option for investors, and it also allows you to diversify your portfolio more easily.

Fractional investing is a great way to get started in the alternative investment market because it allows you to invest in assets that you wouldn’t normally be able to afford.

This can be a great option for people who are new to investing and want to get their feet wet.

Remember, several different platforms offer fractional investing, so be sure to do your research before choosing one.

Invest in Success

We’re honoured to carry on the tradition of performance as stewards of the historic Karma Candy Building at 356 Emerald St. N. in Hamilton, and we’re excited to invite you to join us as co-owners of this property through BuyProperly.

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venture capital

Venture capital is an alternative investment that involves investing in early-stage companies. This can be high-risk, but it also has the potential for high returns. This investment is great for people who are willing to take on a little more risk to potentially earn a higher return, and for anyone that loves being a part of new and innovative ideas.

If you’re interested in venture capital, you’ll need to research the companies you’re considering investing in and be comfortable with the risks involved.

private equity

Private equity is the purchase of ownership in a company that is not publicly traded. This investment is typically made by a group of investors, and the goal is to improve the company’s performance and then sell it or take it public.

Private equity investing is a great option for people who want to be more hands-on with their investments and who are comfortable with a higher level of risk. Although private equity can be high-risk, it can also offer high returns.

art

Investing in art can be a great way to add some diversity to your portfolio. Art can be a good investment for both short-term and long-term goals, and it can appreciate in value over time. Art is a great investment for people who have an eye for aesthetics and who enjoy collecting.

When investing in art, it’s important to do your research and purchase pieces that you believe will hold or increase in value.

wine

Now we come to a fun (yet often overlooked!) investment opportunity.

Like art, wine is another asset that can appreciate in value over time. Wine is a popular alternative investment because it can be enjoyed both now and in the future. Some bottles can generate returns of 10-12% per year.

However, it’s important to remember that wine is a volatile investment, so you should only invest what you’re comfortable with losing.

It’s important to do your research before investing in wine, as some types of wine are more likely to appreciate in value than others.

peer-to-peer lending

Peer-to-peer lending is a form of alternative lending that allows investors to lend money to borrowers without going through a traditional bank. This can be a good option for people who are looking for lower interest rates and don’t want to go through the hassle of applying for a loan.

Peer-to-peer lending also offers the potential for high returns, but it’s important to remember that it can be a risky investment.

reits

Real estate investment trusts, or REITs, are a type of alternative investment that allows you to invest in real estate without actually buying property. REITs are an excellent option for people who want to invest in real estate but don’t have the time or resources to do it themselves.

REITs are a diverse investment, and there are many different types to choose from yielding a wide variety of returns. To get started investing in REITs, you can purchase shares on a stock exchange.

private placements

Private placements are alternative investments that are not available to the general public. They are typically only offered to accredited investors, which means they come with a higher level of risk. Private placements can be a good way to get access to alternative investments that you might not otherwise have access to.

You can find private placements through a variety of sources, such as angel investors, venture capitalists, and private equity firms.

When it comes to alternative investments, there are many options to choose from. New and innovative companies, technologies, and ideas make it easier than ever to get involved in lucrative projects!

It’s important to do your research and understand the risks involved before investing. These alternative investments can be a great way to add diversity to your portfolio and grow your wealth.

If you’re interested in getting started with real estate investing for only $2500, learn more about our latest opportunity with BuyProperly for the Karma Candy Building here.

City of Hamilton

‘Vertical sprawl’ concerns as Province kills Hamilton’s 30-storey height limit

There were very slow volumes this week, as only four sales occurred.

The week marks the slowest point during our current bear market. However, last week witnessed some of the most significant volumes we’ve seen in a while. The last couple of months have seen atypical ebbs and flows in deal volumes.

This week’s largest transaction occurred in Woolwich, where an industrial property traded for $3.4 million ($194/sq. ft).

The week’s remaining deals included two industrial units in Hamilton and a former school in Flamborough.

In the news, the Province has nixed Hamilton‘s 30-storey height limit, Hamilton inaugurated its new city council and mayor, and the Hamilton City Centre Mall will close on December 26 to prepare for development.

News Headlines
Concern over vertical sprawl after province nixes 30-storey height limit
The Hamilton Spectator, November 15, 2022

Who owns the land in Hamilton’s endangered Greenbelt?
The Hamilton Spectator, November 17, 2022

A new era for Hamilton as city council and first woman mayor inaugurated 
CBC News, November 17, 2022

Hamilton City Centre Mall to close on December 26th in preparation for development
CBC News, November 18, 2022

Hamilton immigration census data
The Hamilton Spectator, November 11, 2022

OLT denies developer near Hamilton airport 
The Public Record, November 8, 2022

Hamilton Bulldogs Owner: Being forced to leave FirstOntario Centre during renovations was shocking and unexpected news
CBC News, November 16, 2022

Ontario wants greater grip on regional governance
CBC News, November 16, 2022

Beginning of the end for Canada’s housing market downturn?
RBC Monthly Housing Market Update, November 15, 2022

BMO economist: Housing market correction about halfway done
The Globe and Mail, November 16, 2022

Intelligent Investment: Canadian Cap Rates & Investment Insights Report
CBRE, Q3 2022

What Is Bad Credit?

Bad credit refers to a person’s history of not paying bills on time, as well as the possibility that they would do so in the future. A bad credit score is frequently the result. Companies can also have bad credit if their payment history and current financial status are not in good standing.

Because they are deemed riskier than other borrowers, a person (or company) with negative credit will find it difficult to borrow money, especially at competitive interest rates. This is true of all forms of loans, including both secured and unsecured ones, but the latter has some options.

Understanding Bad Credit

Most people who have ever borrowed money or applied for a credit card have a credit file with one of the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. The information in those files is used to calculate their credit score, which is a figure that serves as an indication to their creditworthiness and includes how much money they owe and whether they pay their payments on time. The FICO score, named after the Fair Isaac Corporation, is the most widely used credit score in the United States.

  1. 35%—payment history. This is given the most importance. It simply shows whether the person with the FICO score has paid their payments on time. Even a few days late can count, yet the longer the payment is late, the worse it is viewed.
  2. 30%—total amount an individual owes. Mortgages, credit card balances, vehicle loans, any bills in collections, court judgments, and other debts fall under this category. The person’s credit usage ratio, which compares how much money they have available to borrow (such as total credit card limits) to how much they owe at any given time, is ‌essential. A high credit usage ratio (say, greater than 20% or 30%) can be interpreted as a red flag and result in a worse credit score.
  3. 15%—length of a person’s credit history.
  4. 10%—mix of credit types. Mortgages, vehicle loans, and credit cards are all examples of this.
  5. 10%—new credit. This includes any jobs or internships that someone has recently started or applied for.
Examples of Bad Credit

FICO scores range from 300 to 850 and debtors with scores of 579 or lower are typically considered having poor credit. 

Fair is described as a score between 580 and 669. These borrowers are significantly less likely to default on loans, making them far less hazardous to lend to than individuals with poor credit scores. However, consumers in this range may incur higher interest rates or have difficulty obtaining loans than borrowers with credit scores closer to the top 850.

How to Improve Bad Credit

There are things you may take if you have low credit (or fair credit) to raise your credit score above 669 and keep it there. Here are some pointers on how to do just that.

Set Up Automatic Online Payments

Do this for all of your credit cards and loans, or at the very least, sign up for the lenders’ email or text reminder lists. This will ensure that you pay at least the monthly minimum on time.

Pay Down Credit Card Debt

Whenever workable, pay more than the minimum payment due. Set a reasonable payback target and strive toward it over time. Paying more than the minimum due will help you increase your credit score if you have a lot of total credit card debt.

Check Interest Rate Disclosures

These disclosures are provided by credit card accounts. Concentrate on paying off the debts with the highest interest rates first. This will free up the most money, which you can then use to pay down other obligations with lower interest rates.

Keep Unused Credit Card Accounts Open

Keep your unused credit card accounts open. Also, don’t create any new accounts that you don’t require. Either action has the potential to harm your credit score.

If you’re having trouble getting a conventional credit card because of your bad credit, consider applying for a secured credit card. It works in the same way as a bank debit card in that you can only spend the amount you have on the deposit. Having a secured card and making timely payments on it can help you rehabilitate your credit and eventually qualify for a regular card if you have a low credit history. It’s also a wonderful approach for young individuals to build their credit history.

Looking for a stress-free way to get started in real estate investing? Check out our current offering with Buy Properly. Buy Properly utilizes a fractional ownership concept to assist investors to build their real estate portfolios. Click here to learn more. >>

How to Invest in Real Estate with Little Money

options are still available

It’s true, you can absolutely purchase property with little or no money available. How? By using some of the following creative financing techniques.

Before we dive in, have you considered fractional real estate investing? This is a new, but very attainable way to invest in real estate.

Why alternative forms of real estate investing are becoming more popular

In recent years, alternative forms of real estate investing have become more popular with investors who are looking to buy a property with little or no money down. This is because traditional forms of financing, such as bank loans, are becoming harder to obtain.

With house prices rising across Canada and the United States, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult for people to “buy in” to the real estate market.

To purchase an investment property, most lenders require a 20-30% down payment. This could be anywhere from $20,000 up to $200,000 or more just for a single-family, residential property!

On top of land transfer taxes, surveys, inspections, and lawyer’s fees, these expenses are enough to push many investors out of the market.

Ongoing real estate expenses
Aside from your down payment and closing costs, investing in real estate also comes with monthly expenses. These include:
  • Insurance
  • Property taxes
  • Maintenance and repairs
  • Condo and management fees
  • Mortgage payments + interest
  • Rental and vacancy expenses
  • Ongoing property management

This means that investors need to set aside even more money to handle monthly expenses that come up. Is it possible to invest in real estate without having a large amount of capital available? AbsolutelyLet’s explore some of the most common ways to invest in real estate with little money.

Fractional investing

 

Fractional investing is a newer concept that’s gained popularity in recent years. It allows investors to pool their money together to purchase a share of an investment property.

This type of investment is often made through a real estate crowdfunding platform, which connects investors with developers who are looking to finance their projects.

With fractional investing, you can spread your investment amount over multiple properties, which also helps to mitigate risk and increase your diversification.

It’s also a great way to get started in real estate investing with little money as you can typically invest as little as $2500.

Seller financing

 

Another option for investors looking to buy a property with little money down is seller financing.

With this type of financing, the seller agrees to act as the bank and provide you with a mortgage. This could be in the form of an interest-only loan or a balloon payment loan.

Seller financing can be a great option for both buyers and sellers. The buyer gets to purchase the property with little money down and the seller gets their asking price for the property.

REITs

 

REITs, or real estate investment trusts, are another way to invest in real estate without having to put down a large amount of money. REITs are companies that own and manage income-producing properties, such as office buildings, shopping malls, apartments, and warehouses.

REITs are traded on stock exchanges and can be bought and sold just like any other stock. This makes them a liquid investment, which is ideal for investors who want to cash out quickly if needed.

Since REITs are traded on stock exchanges, they also offer the potential for growth through capital appreciation.

The downside of investing in REITs is that they’re subject to the ups and downs of the stock market. This means that your investment could lose value if the stock market declines. In addition, there are fees associated with owning a REIT and you often don’t have any transparency about the properties that you are investing in.

Lease-options

 

A lease option is another creative way to invest in real estate with little money down. With a lease option, you agree to lease a property from the owner for a set period.

The length of the lease will depend on the agreement between the buyer and seller, but it’s typically 1-5 years.
During the lease period, the buyer has the option to purchase the property, but they’re not obligated to do so.

Lease options are a great way to get into a property without having to put down a large amount of money. The downside is that you’re not guaranteed to purchase the property at the end of the lease period.

Wraparound mortgages

 

A wraparound mortgage is another financing option for investors looking to buy a property with little money down. With a wraparound mortgage, the buyer agrees to make payments on the existing loan and takes over responsibility for the property.

The buyer then charges their own tenant a higher rent amount and uses that money to make the monthly payments on the mortgage.

Wraparound mortgages can be a great way to get into a property with little money down, but they’re not without risk. If the tenant doesn’t pay their rent on time, the investor could be responsible for making the mortgage payments.

House hacking

 

House hacking is a strategy that allows investors to live in the property they’re purchasing while renting out the other rooms to tenants.

This is a great way to get started in real estate investing as it allows you to live in the property while someone else helps to pay the mortgage.

House hacking can be done with any type of property, but it’s most commonly done with multifamily properties, such as duplexes and triplexes.

The downside of house hacking is that it can be a lot of work. The investor is responsible for finding tenants, collecting rent, and maintaining the property.

Subject-to properties

 

A subject-to-property is a property that’s purchased with the existing mortgage in place.

With this type of purchase, the buyer takes over responsibility for making the monthly mortgage payments, but the seller remains on the hook for the loan.

Subject-to properties can be a great way to get into a property with little money down, but they’re not without risk. If the buyer stops making the mortgage payments, the property will go into foreclosure and the seller will be responsible for any deficiency.

Contract for deed

 

A contract for deed is an agreement between a buyer and seller that allows the buyer to purchase a property while making payments over time.

The buyer doesn’t take ownership of the property until the contract is paid in full.

Contracts for deeds are a great opportunity for buyers, but they’re not without risk. If the buyer stops making the payments, the seller can cancel the contract and evict the buyer from the property.

Joint ventures

 

A joint venture is an agreement between two or more people to work together on a specific project.

In the context of real estate investing, a joint venture is an agreement between two or more people to purchase a property and share in the profits.

Joint ventures are a great way to get into a property with little money down as they allow you to pool your resources with another person or group of people.

The downside of joint ventures is that they can be complex and there’s always the risk that one party will default on the agreement.

Crowdfunding

 

Crowdfunding is a way of raising money from a large group of people.

In the context of real estate investing, crowdfunding allows investors to pool their resources and invest in a property together. Although similar to a fractional model, crowdfunding focuses more on raising capital as opposed to investing in fractional shares of a property.

Crowdfunding platforms such as RealtyMogul and Fundrise make it easy for investors to get started in real estate with little money down.

The downside of crowdfunding is that it’s often a hands-off investment and you’re relying on the platform to manage the property.

Sweat equity

 

Sweat equity is the value of the work that you put into a property.

For example, if you purchase a fixer-upper and put in the time and effort to renovate it, your sweat equity would be the value of the renovations that you did.

Sweat equity can be a great way to get into a property with little money down since it opens up opportunities to get lower-priced properties with huge potential for appreciation. Keep in mind, if the property doesn’t appreciate in value or if the renovations take longer than expected, you could end up losing money on the deal.

Options

An option is a contract that gives the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to purchase a property at a set price within a certain period.

Options are a great way to get into a property with little money down as they allow you to control the property without having to put up all the cash for the purchase price.

The downside of options is that they can be complex and there’s always the risk that the property will decrease in value, leaving the buyer with an option that’s worth less than the purchase price.

There are several ways to get into real estate with little money down. 

The best option for you will depend on your individual circumstances. If you’re looking for a hands-off investment, crowdfunding may be the way to go. If you’re willing to put in the work, a subject-to-property or a fixer-upper may be the best option. Fractional investing is a great option for people who want to own a piece of real estate without the headaches that come along with maintenance and management.

Whatever route you decide to take, do your research and understand the risks involved.
Ready to get started? Take a look at our newest opportunity here and learn how you can get started for only $2,500.

What Is Collateral?

what is collateral?

Collateral is a term used to describe an asset that a lender accepts as security for a loan. Depending on the purpose of the loan, collateral can be real estate or other types of assets. For the lender, the collateral serves as a type of insurance. If the borrower defaults on their loan payments, the lender can seize and sell the collateral to recoup some or all of their losses.

how collateral works

A lender wants to ensure that you’ll be able to repay the loan before giving it to you. As a result, many of them require some level of protection. Collateral is a type of security that reduces the risk for lenders and ensures that the borrower fulfills their financial obligations. If the borrower defaults, then the lender has the option to seize the collateral and sell it, with the proceeds going toward the unpaid amount of the loan. To reclaim any leftover balance, the lender can take legal action against the borrower. 

As previously stated, collateral can take many forms. It usually refers to the type of loan; for example, a mortgage is secured by the residence, but a car loan is secured by the vehicle in issue. Other assets can be used to secure non-specific personal loans. For example, a secured credit card can require a cash deposit equal to the credit limit, such as $500 for a $500 credit limit.

Collateral-backed loans often have lower interest rates than unsecured loans. A lien is a legal right or claim on an asset to satisfy a debt that a lender has on the collateral of a borrower. The borrower has a powerful incentive to repay the loan on time because, if they don’t, they risk losing their home or other collateralized assets.

types of collateral

The type of loan frequently determines the nature of the collateral. Your home becomes the collateral when you take out a mortgage. If you take out a car loan, the car becomes the loan’s collateral. Cars, bank savings deposits, and investment accounts are all frequent forms of collateral that lenders accept. In most cases, retirement accounts are not accepted as collateral.

Future paychecks can also be used as security for very short-term loans, not just payday loans. Traditional banks provide such loans, which are typically for a few weeks. Even if you have a true emergency, you should read the fine print and compare rates before taking out one of these short-term loans.

COLLATERALIZED PERSONAL LOANS

A collateralized personal loan is a type of borrowing in which the borrower pledges an object of value as security for the loan. The collateral must be worth at least as much as the loan amount. If you’re looking for a secured personal loan, your best bet is to go with a financial institution with which you already do business, especially if your collateral is your savings account. If you already have a relationship with the bank, it will be more likely to approve the loan and provide you with a reasonable interest rate.

Examples of collateral loans

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGES
A mortgage is a loan that uses your home as collateral. If a homeowner fails to pay their mortgage for more than 120 days, the loan company can initiate legal action, which could result in the lender taking possession of the home through foreclosure. The property might be sold to satisfy the remaining principal on the loan once it has been transferred to the lender.
HOME EQUITY LOANS
A home can also be used to secure a second mortgage or a home equity line of credit (HELOC). The loan amount will not exceed the available equity in this scenario. For example, if a home is worth $200,000 and the primary mortgage balance is $125,000, a second mortgage or HELOC will only be available for up to $75,000.
MARGIN TRADING
Margin trading also considers securitized loans. An investor uses the balance in his or her brokerage account as collateral to borrow money from a broker to gain shares. The loan increases the number of shares an investor can purchase, hence boosting the potential gains if the value of the shares rises. However, the risks are amplified as well. If the value of the shares drops, the broker will demand payment of the difference. If the borrower fails to cover the loss, the account acts as collateral.

While stock market trading may be dangerous, and real estate investing can be time-consuming, Buy Properly combines the best of both worlds. Buy Properly, a fractional real estate company, lets anyone with just $2,500 participate in real estate. This novel idea is similar to stock investment but without the hassles of real estate ownership. Interested? We knew you would be. Check out our latest opportunity – the Karma Candy Building – on Buy Properly (limited availability, don’t wait to invest!).

230 James St N

14-storey residential development proposed for King & Caroline in Hamilton

230 James St. N. in downtown Hamilton has sold.
This week witnessed a good level of transitions for all subject markets.

For the second consecutive week, the largest purchase occurred in Kitchener, where a 58-unit, multi-residential building at 475-477 Lancaster St. W. sold for $16.5 million ($285,000/unit). It’s a slightly high purchase price, but that’s understandable, considering multi-residential is the most robust asset class.

In Hamilton, the most exciting transaction was for 230 James St. N. The downtown mixed-use building was purchased for $2.35 million ($358/sq. ft). This purchase price appears fair: In 2021 and 2022, James St. has witnessed similar buildings trade in the high $300s to low $400s/sq. ft.  

Hamilton’s Design Review Panel has reviewed three proposals, including a 14-storey, 68-unit multi-residential development for the southwest corner of King and Caroline, which is currently the site of a small retail plaza.

The intersection is on the future LRT line and is attracting extensive development:

  1. The northeast corner is the site of the Radio Arts residential development by Canlight.
  2. The southeast corner saw a 30-storey proposal in 2021 by Vrancor Group.
  3. Just one address to the east, McMaster University’s 30-storey graduate residence is under construction.

The GHA Sales Transaction Database offers you this week’s CRE transaction activity.

Ales Manojlovich

News Headlines

Hamilton Design Review Panel: October 2022
215-217 King St W
160 King St E
2900 King St. E.

ArcelorMittal Dofasco’s ‘green steel’ transformation to start in January
The Hamilton Spectator, October 14, 2022

Municipal Benchmarking Study, Greater Toronto Area
Altus Group, September 27, 2022

Canada’s permanent resident application backlog is forcing thousands of skilled workers to quit and return home
The Globe & Mail, October 12, 2022

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What is an Accredited Investor?

FIRST THINGS FIRST, WHY ACCREDITED INVESTING?

Accredited investing opens up a whole shiny new world of investing made available to you. These include private equity, venture capital, angel investing, and hedge funding.  

WHAT IS AN ACCREDITED INVESTOR?

The accredited investor is someone who has a special status so that they can have investments that are typically more high-risk. While this definition varies from country to country, it also varies from province to province. While there’s no formal process in Ontario, legislation requires that you meet specific criteria to participate in certain investments. This simply means you’ll need to be prepared to provide documentation proving you meet the criteria.

THE CRITERIA

 According to the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC), an accredited investor means you have a:

  • Net income before taxes of more than $200,000 in each of the two most recent calendar years and expected net income of more than $200,000 in the current calendar year.
  • Net income before taxes combined with a spouse of more than $300,000 in each of the two most recent calendar years and expected combined net income of more than $300,000 in the current calendar year.
  • Financial assets, alone or with a spouse, of at least $1 million before taxes but net of related liabilities
  • Financial assets include cash and bank deposits but not the value of a house.
  • Net assets, alone or with a spouse of at least $5 million. Net assets generally include all of your assets after subtracting your debt.

Contact the OSC’s Inquiries & Contact Centre to learn more about these rules.

Are you an accredited investor?

Are you an accredited investor?